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Birth Education Class Practice + Resources

Q

Teaching Hiatus

Thank you for visiting Open Circle and your interest in our center. We are currently on an extended teaching hiatus.

While away from teaching, we are preparing a self-paced version of our unique, experiential-based childbirth and parenting education courses.

For parent + baby services in the community, we invite you to visit our local resources page to explore supports from local providers with a range of specialties. For prenatal yoga, please visit Full Radiance Yoga. Additional educational supports can be found on our YouTube page and Series Resources page.

Over the past 20 years, we have been nourished and had our work deepened through sharing time with each of you. It has been an honor to witness new birth and community between families grow.

As we enter our own process of gestation, transformation and eventual re-birth, we would love to continue to support thriving connection. Let us know about your family’s adventures, share reflections on your experiences at the center, and reach out for contact information of other families you met while at Open Circle.* Let’s connect!

*shared only with express permission

©Lisa Gendron | Agroterra Birth

 

Class participants can find home practice suggestions, chapters to review in your web app, and a variety of resources which correspond with each class in the series, below. We encourage you to follow the home practices and web app suggestions. However, we do not expect you to explore ALL the resources we provide for each class.

Instead, we hope as curiosities and interests arise, you will feel supported by our curated lists for each topic. Some families are reassured and calmed by a lot of information. Others find a sense of trust and calm through listening inward and limiting external research. The best path for you is the one the helps you build a trust of your inner knowing and capacity; an experience of of safety in your birth setting and with your medical team; and a sense of deep connection to your birth support.

1. From In to Out: Understanding Birth

Recommended Home Practice

Practice Awareness Scans 1-2 times per day 
Practice Belly Breathing 3-7 times / week

Recommended App Reading

•Explore chapters 1-3 in your Understanding Birth WEB APP

Resources

Videos depicting real sounds, movement + visuals of birth:
Badassbirthingmother Instagram (ALERT: graphic, real birth)
•Hospital-Based Birth Stories

Understanding the Pushing Stage of Labor
Pushing in Birth

Protecting the Perineum / Pelvic Floor

.Evidence on Birthing Positions + Tried-and-True Midwifery Practices for Protecting the Perineum

Tracking Your Baby’s Activity + Position During Pregnancy
Kick Counts
•Belly Mapping 

Pregnancy Dietary Support
Real Food for Pregnancy
Real Food for Gestational Diabetes

Geek Out + Go Deep
Hormonal Physiology of Childbearing 
Reclaiming Childbirth as a Rite of Passage
Birthing From Within

2A. Labor of Love: Movement and Partner Support for Birth

Recommended Home Practice

•Practice Feeling the Breath or Raft + the Waves 1-2x this week
•Schedule 4 20-min labor movement practice sessions before 36 weeks 
•If not taking class 2b, watching The Pushing Stage of Labor Video and practice pushing exercises (in video and workbook).

Recommended Reading + Videos

•Explore chapter 4 in your Understanding Birth Web APP

If not taking class 2b, consider exploring:

Pushing In Labor
Understanding the Pushing Stage (video)
•Finding the Push (minute 57:53)
•Observing the Push (minute 59:29)

•VIdeos of The Pushing Stage of Labor in Real Births
Consider watching some or all of the following videos exploring the pushing stage of labor in different settings and with different approaches. All of the videos below are variations of normal birth. They DO NOT depict emergencies or complications.


Many of the Spontaneous pushing videos take place at home or in birth centers, and in tubs. It is common in these births that the baby is handled very little.
It is unusual (but possible; most frequently with midwives) to be supported in truly spontaneous pushing in hospitals. More often nurses and practitioners practice guided or directed pushing. 

It is hard to find good video examples of what is most common in US hospitals (likely because people are often told they can’t film at this time). The most common scenario in hospital settings involves directed pushing, a lot of contact and hands on the perineum/genital area, and quite frequently forceful handling/manuvering of the baby.

1. Spontaneous, Unmedicated Pushing: 
Home/Birth Center:
Hospital
Fast Pushing Stage with Fetal Ejection Reflex (happens in some births; less frequent)
Unmedicated, multiple positions, vocal (start video at 30:55)
2. Guided Pushing, Both medicated and Unmedicated*
Mix spontaneous and guided, unmedicated on back, moderate “hands on” (pushing starts at 12:39)
3. Directed Pushing, Both Medicated and Unmedicated + Highly Interventive Delivery
Hosptial guided pushing with practitioner manipulation (common in hospital settings, especially with OB practices)
4. Common Variations: wrapped cord, bulging (unbroken) amniotic sac, born en caul
Resources and Learning Materials

Pushing Stage of Labor:
See Recommended Reading + Videos Above

Manual Support Techniques:
•Double Hip Squeeze
•Sacral Pressure
•Double Knee Press (min 1:35)

Acupressure for Labor
PDF Booklets + Videos w/ Deborah Betts, DAc

Supporting “Optimal Fetal Positioning” in Pregnancy 
A “Good fit between mother + baby”
•Prenatal Yoga at Open Circle
Online Prenatal Yoga with Jane Austin
•Spinning Babies Daily Essentials
Breech Turning Movement Techniques
•Open Circle Breech Support Page (coming soon)

Supporting “Optimal Fetal Positioning” in Birth
A “Good fit between mother + baby”
•The Miles Circuit 
•Spinning Babies Suggestions for a Variety of Baby Positions

Supporting Comfort, Strength and Mobility in Pregnancy + Birth
•Prenatal Yoga at Open Circle
•Prenatal Yoga with Jane Austin (video + online classes)

Pushing In Labor
Understanding the Pushing Stage (video)
      •Finding the Push (minute 57:53)
      •Observing the Push (minute 59:29)

Protecting the Pelvic Floor

 

2B. Labor of Love: Massage, Hands-On Support, Acupressure + The Pushing Stage

Recommended Home Practice

•Choose a time to practice progressive relaxation (each person guide the other with voice or touch)
•review Massage in Labor PDF and practice massage 2x this week

Recommended App Reading + Videos

•continue to explore chapter 4 in your Understanding Birth Web App

Pushing In Labor
Understanding the Pushing Stage (video)
•Finding the Push (minute 57:53)
•Observing the Push (minute 59:29)

Protecting the Perineum / Pelvic Floor

.Evidence on Birthing Positions + Tried-and-True Midwifery Practices for Protecting the Perineum

•VIdeos of The Pushing Stage in Real Births
Consider watching some or all of the following videos exploring the pushing stage of labor in different settings and with different approaches. All of the videos below are variations of normal birth. They DO NOT depict emergencies or complications.

Many of the Spontaneous pushing videos take place at home or in birth centers, and in tubs. It is common in these births that the baby is handled very little. It is unusual (but possible; most frequently with midwives) to be supported in truly spontaneous pushing in hospitals. More often nurses and practitioners practice guided or directed pushing. 

It is hard to find good video examples of what is most common in US hospitals (likely because people are often told they can’t film at this time). The most common scenario in hospital settings involves directed pushing, a lot of contact and hands on the perineum/genital area, and quite frequently forceful handling/manuvering of the baby.

1. Spontaneous, Unmedicated Pushing: 
Home/Birth Center:
Hospital
Fast Pushing Stage with Fetal Ejection Reflex (happens in some births; less frequent)
Unmedicated, multiple positions, vocal (start video at 30:55)
2. Guided Pushing, Both medicated and Unmedicated*
Mix spontaneous and guided, unmedicated on back, moderate “hands on” (pushing starts at 12:39)
3. Directed Pushing, Both Medicated and Unmedicated + Highly Interventive Delivery
Hosptial guided pushing with practitioner manipulation (common in hospital settings, especially with OB practices)
4. Common Variations: wrapped cord, bulging (unbroken) amniotic sac, born en caul
Resources and Learning Materials

Massage In Labor
Evidence For Massage In Labor (Evidence Based Birth)
Massage During Contractions and Breaks

Manual Support Techniques:
•Double Hip Squeeze 1
•Sacral Pressure
•Double Knee Press (min 1:35)

Acupressure for Labor
PDF Booklets + Videos w/ Deborah Betts, DAc

Supporting “Optimal Fetal Positioning” in Pregnancy 
A “Good fit between mother + baby”
•Prenatal Yoga at Open Circle
•Spinning Babies Daily Essentials
Breech Turning Movement Techniques
•Open Circle Breech Support Page (coming soon)

Supporting “Optimal Fetal Positioning” in Birth
A “Good fit between mother + baby”
•The Miles Circuit 
•Spinning Babies Suggestions for a Variety of Baby Positions

Supporting Comfort, Strength and Mobility in Pregnancy + Birth
•Prenatal Yoga at Open Circle
•Prenatal Yoga with Jane Austin (video + online classes)

3. Power + Pain: Working with the Sensations of Birth

Recommended Home Practice

-Choose Feeling the Breath (PDF workbook), Belly Breathing or The Raft and the Waves 3x this week (5 min each practice)
-Practice Clearing the Space for Birth (PDF workbook)
Complete Power + Pain reflexion exercises for birthing person + support (exercise PDF)

Recommended App Reading

Review on coping strategies from classes 2-3 in web app Chapter 4
-Prepare for next class by exploring Chapters 5 + 6 On Interventions, Procedures and Cesareans

Resources and Learning Materials

All of the resources provided in web app chapter 4 and classes 1-3 focus on sensation coping (see lists of resources in class 1, 2a and 2b, above).

Pushing Stage of Labor:
See Recommended Reading + Videos Above

To explore further, the following resource can be helpful:
Comfort In Labor by Penny Simkin
Evidence Based Birth Pain Management Series
The Birth Partner by Penny Simkin

Pharmacological Pain Management Resources:
The Power + Pain class is geared toward non-pharmacological pain management tools prior to epidural use or for unmedicated births. It is important to also learn about pharmacological tools for managing labor sensations including epidurals, nitrous oxide and analgesics. You can learn more about both through talking to your providers, reviewing your Understanding Birth app, and exploring the chapter on pharmacologic pain management in the Penny Simkin’s book: The Birth Partner.

 –Evidence Based Birth Pain Management Series 
Lamaze International on Epidurals
Limiting Unwanted Side Effects of Epidurals (Lamaze)
Weighing the Pros and Cons of Epidurals (Simkin)
Better Epidural: Maximize the Experience + Decrease Challenges
Evidence on Pharmacological Pain Management (Childbirth Connection)

4A. Informed Choices: Understanding Informed Consent, Family Rights, and Birth Plans

Recommended Home Practice

-Practice Tracing the Labyrinth (exercise PDF) and Awareness Scans 3x each this week
-Prepare 3 questions for your next prenatal appointment and find a place at home to record ongoing questions for future prenatal appointments
-Practice “advocating for yourself” by requesting changes to improve your experience. Start with easier asks, build to harder asks.
-Begin to talk about a birth plan and what’s important to you / your birth support
-Email us if you would like an access code to birth plan tool from (M)otherboard
-Skim or work on “Decreasing Emotional Trauma” (exercise PDF)
-Skim or work on  “Strategies for Specific Triggers. . .in Childbirth” (exercise PDF)

Recommended App Reading

-Review chpaters 5 + 6 on Interventions, Procedures and Cesareans in your Understanding Birth web app
-Read through the Informed Choices Section of your PDF workbook

Resources and Learning Materials

 

-For more in-depth information than that in your Understanding Birth web app, go to the “Additional Resources” section of our Resources Page
Evidence Based Birth
Birth Monopoly

Books
Childbirth Handbook: a Step by Step Guide to Creating Your Birth Plan by Stephanie Mitchell, CNM
The Birth Partner by Penny Simkin

Community Care, Education and Action for Families of Color
Urban Perinatal Education Center
SistaFire

Doula Care
Doula Care at Open Circle
Doulas of Rhode Island (DoRI) (Professional Association; doula lists)
Umoja Nia Collective (Doulas of Color Supporting Families of Color)
RI Birthworker Coop (Doula Coop; List of Doulas Taking Insurance)
Doulas Conectadas (Spanish Speaking Doulas Collective)

 

4B. Informed Choices: Understanding Medical Interventions, Procedures, and Cesareans

Recommended Home Practice

-Practice using the B.R.A.I.N acronym to explore a decision that you need to make. Can be related to birth or something else, but choose something with some level of importance.

-Write a beginning draft of your birth plan; decide what date you will go over it with your practitioner (optimally by 34 weeks)

-Email us if you would like an access code to birth plan tool from (M)otherboard

-Choose “Decreasing Emotional Trauma” or “Strategies for Specific Triggers in Childbirth” (exercise in PDF workbook) to work on with your birth support / together.

Recommended App Reading

-Continue to use chapters 5 + 6 from your Understanding Birth web app to prepare birth plan

-Explore more detailed resources on specific topics in your hyperlinked PDF or the “Additional Resources” section here.

Resources and Learning Materials

-For more in-depth information than that in your Understanding Birth web app, explore:

– “Additional Resources” section of our Resources Page
Evidence Based Birth
Birth Monopoly

 

Books: 
Childbirth Handbook: a Step by Step Guide to Creating Your Birth Plan by Stephanie Mitchell, CNM
The Birth Partner by Penny Simkin

5. A Brave New World: Newborn Family Care

Recommended Home Practice

-Choose one of the meditations or breathwork practices to do 1x per day
-Practice partner guided “progressive relaxation” 2x this week
-Schedule 2 hours in the coming weeks to work on your 4th Trimester Plan
-Continue working on your birth plan / collaborating with your medical team

-Make a list of questions you have about caring for a newborn

Recommended Reading

-Review Chapter 8 in your Understanding Birth web app
-Prepare for Newborn Care Class by familiarizing yourself with the basic contents of the Understanding Newborns web app

Resources and Learning Materials

 At Open Circle:
Group Infant Discovery Sessions at Open Circle
-Infant Developmental Movement Education
-Preparing for Caring Private Session
4th Trimester Doula Care 

In the Community:
(including resources for support groups, lactation support, physical healing, mental health, family care, etc.)
Please visit our local resources page

Paid Leave Resources
Rhode Island Temporary Caregiver Insurance  

Mental Health Support
-See our local resources page for a list of local therapists and more supports
-Immediate Support: The Day Hospital at Women and Infants Hospital
Butler Hospital Assessments and Emergency Admissions

Sexuality and Intimacy After Birth
Mating in Captivity by Esther Perel
Post Baby Hanky Panky
Couples and Sexual Health Resources

Fathers Groups and Resources
-Open Circle Dad Group
please let us know of other valuable resources you’ve found for fathers in our area, or books for fathers that you have loved!

LGBTQ+ Community

-See our resources page 
-Rhode Island LGBTQ+ Parenting and Family-Building Group: Email to be added to the group/for more info

4th Trimester Book Resources:
Birth Parent
The First 40 Days (healing and nutrition after birth)
Nobody Told Me About That (navigating the first 6 weeks postpartum)
What No One Tells You – A Guide to Your Emotions
Eating for Two 
Natural Health After Birth

6. A BABY! Now What!? – Newborn Care

Recommended Home Practice

-Practice 5-minute meditation (PDF p3) or Points of Contact meditation daily or 1-3x this week

-Practice Feeling the Breath (PDF p6) with birth support

-Make a list of questions you have about breastfeeding / chestfeeding / feeding babies for next class

Recommended App Reading

-Review Newborn Web App
-Prepare for Breastfeeding + Bonding by familiarizing yourself with contents in you Breastfeeding App

Resources and Learning Materials

Note: For Infant Feeding Supports, see Breastfeeding workshop resources in class 7.

Supportive and Evidence Based Parenting Books
Nurture Revolution by Greer Kirshenbaum
The 6 Needs of Every Child: Empowering Parents and Kids Through the Science of Connection* (book)
Please note that this book is written by a child psychologist and his wife from the perspective of their fields of expertise, life experience and references their Christian faith. I was initially unsure about including it because not every family (including my own) is Christian, and I thought it might not resonate for that reason. However, it is a really beautifully presented tool for parents on many levels, and I encourage you to let the parts that mention religion simply be placeholders for your own faith or value systems. The support, compassion and knowledge offered to parents throughout is superb.

Newborn Development and Behaviors
-Understanding Newborn Cues** (highly recommended video)
The Amazing Talents of the Newborn (video)
Babies Project: Developmental Movement Education
On The Way to Walking: The Essential Guide To Natural Movement Development
Wonder Weeks App (following infant development)
Fussy Evenings
Understanding Developmental Milestones

Newborn Awareness States
Understanding Newborn Cues (linked above)
Amazing Talents of the Newborn (linked above)
Chart of Awareness States
Awareness States Applications for Caregiving

Holding Your Baby
-Preparing for Caring Private Session at Open Circle or Babies Project
-From Birth To Walking  (book; linked above)
Video Demonstration 1
Video Demonstration 2
Video Demonstration 3

Infant Soothing
Happiest Baby 5 S’s Video
Swaddling Video
Understanding Newborn Cues 

Babywearing / Infant Carriers
Babywearing Guidelines
General Soft Carrier Instructional Video showing two newborn holds*
*best to refer to the video from your specific carrier brand

Because of how beneficial “wearing” your baby is for both you and baby, it’s worth pushing through the early learning curve to become comfortable at this skill. It will offer you more freedom and decrease baby fussiness. The following links are for soft carriers which are excellent for newborns – toddlers. There are many carriers out there so consulting with other parents and babywearing groups can be helpful.

Diapering and Elimination
How to diaper a Newborn (video)
Baby Poop Guide (video)
Baby Poop Photos (helpful for recognizing normal or of concern)

Bathing Your Baby 
Bathing Video 1
Bathing Video 2

Bathing Temp: 68-72 degrees fahrenheit
Bathing Frequency: Avoid Bathing for first 24 hours. Sooner can make it difficult for a newborn to retain body temperature. After 24 hours, it depends on a family’s beliefs and traditions. Some bathe once a week, some daily. From HealthyChildren.org: Your infant doesn’t need much bathing if you wash the diaper area thoroughly during diaper changes. Three times a week during the first year may be enough. Bathing her more frequently may dry out her skin, particularly if soaps are regularly used. . . 

Skin Care + Products
Soaps: Keep in mind that using soap too frequently on the skin strips important skin oils that maintain skin health and serve as a support in protecting the baby’s system from pathogens. Often warm water is all that’s needed and best for the skin. Gentle, unscented and limited chemical content soap can be used if needed after a particularly dirty diaper or if baby has extra “stank” or cradle cap. Avoid petroleum-based products

Lotions: in general, your baby does not need skin lotions and actually benefits from simply avoiding bathing too often and stripping natural skin oils. The health of their skin is supported best through adequate nutrition and hydration, and avoiding detergents or soaps with chemicals, scents and other allergens. If you do chose to use skin lotions, consult with your pediatrician and avoid petroleum products, scents and lotions or oils with added chemicals. Food-grade, non-nut organic oils can be a good option, such as sunflower oil.

Dressing Your Baby 
Putting clothing on and taking it off (Video)
Newborn clothing recommendations (Video)

Temperature + Humidity Regulation
-General Temp: 68-72; General Humidity: 40-60%

-Following the recommendations above may or may not be possible for all families, depending on the environment in which they live and comfortable living temperatures for parents. Because of this, it is also good to learn to recognize signals that your baby may be too cold or too warm, and to modify their dress to help them regulate temperature.

General considerations: babies in the early months cannot regulate or retain temperature as effectively as adults. It is commonly said to dress the baby in the same number of layers that keeps you comfortable, plus one additional layer.

Having said that, adults and babies may have constitutions that chill or overheat differently from their parents. Therefore, pay attention to signals of either too much cold or heat in your baby:
-Too cool: skin on hands, feet or face cool to the touch. Mottled skin. Fussiness or listlessness
Too hot: flushed in face, sweating on hairline at forehead or nap of neck. Fussiness

Remember that the head, belly, hands and feet are areas that lose heat quickly, and can be used to help a baby regulate temperature without having to change all their clothing (ie: add socks and hat if cool, or take off if hot).

Supporting Temperature Regulation, Digestion and Weight Growth: keep your baby’s belly covered and warm. Using onesies under other layers (in cooler weather) or on their own (in warmer weather) supports this.

Newborn Feeding Resources: please see Class 7: Breastfeeding / Infant Feeding

Newborn Sleep Resources
-Family Sleep Strategies in your PDF workbook pgs 58-66
American Academy of Pediatricians Recommendations
Co-Sleeping Research and Information on Safety Practices – Notre Dame Sleep Lab
No-Cry Sleep Solution (book)
*please note that many books and programs about newborn sleep (first three months) are NOT based on our best understanding of a baby’s physical and psycho-emotional needs or their developmental capacities. Babies in the first three months NEED to wake to feed multiple times throughout the night, and do not have the brain development to begin to learn modified patterns until at least 4 months of age. Avoid modalities that suggest the goal of getting a newborn to sleep through the night – this is not healthy for them.

Helping Pets Adjust to Baby + Keeping Baby Safe Around Animals
Dogs
Cats

Choosing your Baby’s Practitioner
(Pediatrician / Family Doctor / Nurse Practitioner)

Your relationship with your baby’s doctor will likely last throughout their infancy into young adulthood. Your doctor will be the one you call when you have concerns or frights about your child’s health. For this reason, it is a very important relationship and finding someone you trust matters hugely. Just as in choosing your maternity care doctor, the style of care from one pediatrician or family doctor to the next varies dramatically.  You can work and change as many practitioners as you need to find one that you feel confident with.  

Newborn Procedures
Talk with your healthcare providers and pediatricians about any questions you may have. Additional information can be found through research, including: 
Vitamin K
Eye Ointment
Hepatitis B Vaccine
Newborn Screening Tests

Circumcision
Circumcision is a controversial topic among medical practitioners, in different sectors of society, and from one governmental health organization to another. When the decision is made based on religious tradition, the questions and reasons are different from those of a more Western science / physiologic perspective. Because the procedure is a serious one, with both short-term and lifelong impact for baby boys, it is important to go into this decision informed and making a thoughtful choice that you feel clear is best for your baby.

Resources to learn more about circumcision:
-Good overview created by a doula with extensive info for parents to consider. The tone in this leans somewhat against circumcision. With that said, the info + descriptions are correct and factual 
-Evidence and Ethics on Circumcision from Evidence Based Birth 
-CIrcumcision and Law  Comparison of circumcision laws in a number of countries

Newborn First Aid Kit Supplies
What to have on hand in baby first aid kit:  First, we highly recommend taking an infant first aid and CPR class. Next, there’s comfort in buying a pre-packaged infant first aid kit, but it’s possible to create one on your own. Whether you build your own kit or buy one a pre-made first aid kits, it’s a good idea to prepare ahead with one before baby needs it. Here are things to include:
 
• Nasal aspirator (nosefrida is an effective brand)
• Saline nasal drops
• Baby thermometer
• Medicine dropper
• Baby nail clippers
• Emery boards (nail file)
• Baby brush or comb
• Cradle cap brush
• Sterile gauze
• Infant Acetaminophen (consult your doctor for dosage recommendations)
• Antibiotic cream (consult your doctor for dosage recommendations)
• Alcohol swabs
• Antibiotic ointment (consult your doctor for dosage recommendations)
• Age-appropriate Band-Aids
• Emergency contact card (with pediatrician and other important info for caregivers

When to call the Doctor
First things first: 
Get accustomed to your newborns general patterns. For example, around how often does your baby feed, eat and sleep, play, fuss. . . ? how many times do you usually need to change their diapers each day? How does your baby usually respond to you?
Noticing significant changes in your personal baby’s normal behaviors and patterns will help you know when to reach out to your infant’s healthcare provider. If you feel worried, trust your gut/intuition and call your baby’s provider. Know, too, that as we are getting to know our baby, it is quite common in the early weeks and months to call our provider frequently as we learn what is normal and how to read our children.

Be prepared:
You will feel more in control if you have the following information readily accessible:
• The name of your newborn’s doctor and the phone number
• The doctor’s office hours and call hours
• Instructions that detail what to do when the office is closed
• The location of the hospital that the doctor is affiliated with
• The name, phone number, and location of the pharmacy that you use

Be prepared to answer questions such as: 
• What are your newborn’s symptoms?
• What is your newborn’s temperature? (Note: Rectal thermometers are typically used with newborns.)
• How many bowel movements, loose stools, or wet diapers has your newborn had?
• Does your newborn have any allergies or conditions? • Does your newborn take any medication? If so, what kind of medication and what is the dose?

Write down any instructions that you’re given to help you keep track

MEDICAL CONCERNS

Call the Doctor’s Office if your newborn:
• Has a cough
• Has any eye problems, such as mucus or redness
• Has a runny nose making it difficult to breath, even after using nasal saline
• Yellowish skin or eyes, without any other concerning symptoms
• Is vomiting
• Is eating less than usual or is having problems with breastfeeding, such as difficulty latching onto the nipple (call lactation support, first or in addition)
• Is not having regular bowel movements
• Has stools that are much looser than normal
• Is crying more than usual and is unable to be consoled
• Has problems sleeping
• Has blood or pus around the navel, or if circumcised, around the penis
• Has a rash that is not responding to treatment
• Has ear drainage
• Is not responding to sounds

IMMEDIATELY CALL YOUR DOCTOR IF YOUR BABY HAS
• Rectal temperature above 100.4°F (38°C)
• Rectal temperature below 97.8°F (36.5°C)
• Any breathing problems, like difficulty breathing or fast breathing
• Other signs of not getting enough oxygen, like blue lips, nose, or fingernails
• Extreme tiredness or drowsiness, difficulty waking
• Is limp
• Signs of dehydration, such as wetting less than 6 diapers in 24 hours, sunken eyes, sunken soft spot, no tears when crying
• Soft spot on the top of the head looks bulging
• Seizure
• Bloody urine, stool, or vomit • Injury to any part of the body, especially the head

Parent + Baby Groups:
See our Local Resources Page for additional local offerings

At Open Circle:
Group Infant Discovery Sessions at Open Circle
-Parent + Baby Yoga
Infant Developmental Movement Education
-Preparing for Caring Private Session
4th Trimester Doula Care 

RI Community Offerings: 
-Agroterra Birth 4th Trimester Group (coming soon)
Providence Postpartum Support Group
Southern RI Parent’s Circle

7. The Nursling – Breastfeeding + Bonding

Recommended Homework

-Choose 1-2 personal meditations to continue daily or 3x/week until the baby’s birth (and after if they’re helpful!

-Choose 1 partner / support person meditation to practice weekly (or more!) 

-Schedule time to complete your birth and 4th Trimester plans before 36 weeks (when possible)

Recommended App Reading

-Explore your Breastfeeding App

-Make a calendar of topics in apps you’d like to explore in coming weeks

-Make a list of the class resources you can return to after baby is born (ex: this page, web apps, etc)

Resources and Learning Materials

App Support:
Understanding Breastfeeding App (provided in class)
Birth + Beyond App by Global Health Media

Video Support:
Establishing Supply and Feeding for Full Term and Preemie’s  
Global Health Media Breastfeeding Video Series (choose “breastfeeding for mothers videos”
Breast Massage + Hand Expression 
(highly useful massage offering multiple benefits: decrease engorgement, release blocked ducts, avoid mastitis and improve pumping output)

Families with Low Income / Limited Resources
-WIC Breastfeeding and Nutrition Services

Breastfeeding in Public and the Workplace Laws
Laws by State 
Break Time for Nursing Mothers under the FLSA
Employment Protections for Workers Who Are Pregnant or Nursing
USBC Existing Laws

Medication and Body Products Safety
www.infantrisk.com
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK501922/

General Support
www.kellymom.com
www.breastfeedinginc.ca
www.firstdroplets.com
www.llli.org

Book Support
-Nursing Mother’s Companion by Kathleen Huggins
Breastfeeding Made Simple by Nancy Mohrbacher and Kathleen Kendall-Tackett
The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding by La Leche League International
The Ultimate Breastfeeding Book of Answers by Jack Newman
Working and Breastfeeding Made Simple by Nancy Mohrbacher

State-Wide Breastfeeding Organizations
Most states in the US have a breastfeeding organization that is a resource to find support groups, support professionals and other breastfeeding information. Try searching with your State’s name and the words “Breastfeeding Coalition” or “Breastfeeding Council”
Rhode Island Breastfeeding Coalition
Massachuessetts Nursing Mothers Council
Connecticut Breastfeeding Coalition


Internationally Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLC’s)
Good resources to find local IBCLC’s include talking with your medical provider, doulas, childbirth educators, pediatrician offices, breastfeeding coalitions and others involved in birth and postpartum care for families. It makes sense to have some names before the baby comes, and to have explored whether they bill insurance or will provide you with an invoice, as well as what your insurance covers.

Partial List of RI IBCLC’s (there are others to be found)
Dr. Ashley Lakin
Michelle Chirby (MA in clinical lactation)
-Aimee Quigley @ South County Health 401-788-1226
Jenn DeMarco
Allison Miranda
Healthy Babies, Happy Moms

Certified Lactation Counselors (CLC’s)
Good resources to find local IBCLC’s include talking with your medical provider, doulas, childbirth educators, pediatrician offices, breastfeeding coalitions and others involved in birth and postpartum care for families. It makes sense to have some names before the baby comes, and to have explored whether they bill insurance or will provide you with an invoice, as well as what your insurance covers

Partial List of CLC’s in RI (there are many more!)
– Paulette Butler at www.nightlightdoula.com
– Latisha Michel at www.readysetlatchgo.com
– Susie FInnerty at www.susiefinnerty.com
– Lisa Gendron, CPM at www.agroterrabirth.com

 

Hospital Breastfeeding Support Lines:
Most maternity hospitals have a daytime or 24-hour support line that can be called by families who have recently given birth. Gather this information in an easy to find place before giving birth.
RI Hospital Support Lines:
-Kent County Hospital
401-737-7010 x3332
Leave a message and a lactation consultant will return your call

-Landmark Medical Center
401-769-4100 x2218
24-hour call-in assistance available

-Newport Hospital
401-845-1110
24-hour call-in assistance available

-South County Hospital
401-788-1226
Leave a message and a lactation consultant will return your call

Women & Infants Hospital
(800) 711-7011
Monday – Friday, 9:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Leave a message and a RN/IBCLC will return your call. Appointments are available for mothers after hospital discharge. Services are provided in English and Spanish.

Local Support Groups
There are often local support groups, sometimes peer led, sometimes lactation professional led in the community you live. Search for this in your area through your hospital, doula associations, breastfeeding associations, childbirth educator associations, pediatrician office, google searches, etc. Some of the common national organizations that have local chapters are La Leche League, Chocolate Milk Café, Baby Café.
Baby Café (Olneyville)
-Health Babies Happy Moms (East Greenwich)
-La Leche League Meetings (RI, MA; Multiple locations)
-Chocolate Milk (Pawtucket)

Hospital Based Support Groups
Many Hospitals also host breastfeeding support groups. Dates and times below may have shifted. Call each hospitals to confirm correct days and times.
Kent County Hospital
737-7010 X3332 (WARM LINE)
New Mothers support group meets every Wednesday, 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. in the Women’s Care Unit on the 3rd floor. Breastfeeding support is available.

Newport Hospital
845-1110 (WARM LINE)
Breastfeeding support group held on Thursdays, 12:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. in the Birthing Center on the 7th floor.

South County Hospital
788-1226 (WARM LINE)
Breastfeeding support group/New Mom’s Club meets Tuesdays, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. in the South County Hospital Potter Conference Center. Additional group meets Fridays, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. at the Westerly South County Hospital Medical and Wellness Center, 268 Post Road (Route 1), Westerly. Free. All mothers welcome.

Women & Infants Hospital
(800) 711-7011 (WARM LINE)
New Mothers Group, an informal mother-baby gathering, meets every Wednesday,
10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Call Health Education Department at 276-7800 for details.